The University of Arizona
banner

GLAUCOMA RESEARCH


What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that gradually steals sight without warning and often without symptoms. Vision loss is caused by damage to the optic nerve. It was once thought that high intraocular pressure (IOP) was the main cause of this damage. We now know that other factors must also be involved since people with “normal” IOP can experience vision loss from glaucoma. Glaucoma is a chronic disease. It must be treated for life. Currently, its causes are not well understood and there is no cure.

  Bullet

It is estimated that over 3 million Americans have glaucoma but only half of those know they have it.

  Bullet

Approximately 120,000 are blind from glaucoma, accounting for 9% to 12% of all cases of blindness in the U.S.

  Bullet

About 2% of the population ages 40-50 and 8% over 70 have elevated IOP.

  Bullet

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the U.S. and the first leading cause of preventable blindness.

  Bullet

Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness among African-Americans.

  Bullet

Other high-risk groups include: people over 60, family members of those already diagnosed, diabetics, and people who are severely nearsighted.

Bullet

Estimates put the total number of suspected cases of glaucoma at around 65 million worldwide.

Source: Glaucoma Research Foundation


The UA Glaucoma Research Program

The Glaucoma Research Program at the University of Arizona has several research arms to address this serious disease at different levels:

Bullet

Clinical trials of novel pharmaceuticals for the management of ocular hypertension

  Bullet

Development of biocompatible surgical implants for those patients who are unresponsive to pharmacological and/or laser treatment

  Bullet

Laser/tissue interactions

  Bullet

Research of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate aqueous outflow

  Bullet

Basic research of receptor activation in aqueous secretion

  Bullet

Genetics of glaucoma

  Bullet

Assessment of efficacy of glaucoma screening technology


The Glaucoma Research Team

W. Daniel Stamer, PhD
Associate Professor and Associate Head of Ophthalmology and Vision Science
Associate Professor of Pharmacology
Director of Glaucoma Research Laboratory

John W. Regan, PhD
Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Brian S. McKay, PhD
Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Vision Science
Assistant Professor of Cell Biology

Stuart K. Williams, PhD
Professor and Head of Biomedical Engineering Program

Lupita Rodríguez, MD
Assistant Research Professor
of Ophthalmology and Vision Science

Miguel Alvarez, MD
Assistant Research Professor
of Ophthalmology and Vision Science


With Your Help, We Can Overcome

This Blinding Condition

   
Bullet

Become an eye donor: Groundbreaking discoveries on glaucoma depend upon research using donated eyes.

Bullet

Write to your Congressional representative: As a taxpayer, your representative needs to know that research on glaucoma is important to you.

Bullet

Monetary gifts: Donations of all sizes, including planned giving, major gifts, restricted and unrestricted gifts, support glaucoma research in Arizona. Every bit helps. Your gift will truly be a “gift of sight.”

 

Remember . . . . . .

  Bullet

The best way to protect yourself from loss of vision due to glaucoma is with regular, thorough eye exams. You can’t treat a disease you don’t know you have.

  Bullet

Loss of vision from glaucoma is irreversible.

  Bullet

Glaucoma usually has no signs or symptoms until serious loss of vision occurs.

  Bullet

Most cases of glaucoma are controlled with medication or surgery.


For more information or to help support glaucoma research
at the University of Arizona, contact:

Director, Glaucoma Research
The University of Arizona
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science
655 N. Alvernon Way, Suite 108
Tucson, AZ 85711
(520) 626-7767 (phone)
(520) 626-1757 (FAX)


LINKS

University of Arizona Department of Ophthalmology Clinical Studies

Facts about Glaucoma

Are You at Risk for Glaucoma?

Glaucoma: How Much Do You Know?

National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health